Twitter and the gaming industry

I am not new to twitter at all.  I have been using it for a couple of years under the handle @makeyourself270 and love it for a variety of reasons.  One aspect that I had never experimented with, however, was lists.  Therefore, I was very eager to do this assignment once I had seen that this feature was a required part of it.  Through listorious I found a list of tweeters in the gaming community that 451 members large.  Sifting through to find ten I was interested in and also not yet following was hard.  After rounding out two tweeters shy of a baker’s dozen, it was time to start my weekend of following.

I made a point of following ten individuals as opposed to groups, websites, or companies because I wanted to make sure to observe the balance between personal and professional tweeting.  I believe the choices I made were good, with a mix of game designers, community managers and journalists.  I did notice rather quickly that one of the people I chose to follow, the top tweeter on the gaming list from listorious, was only a person interested in games.  She was in actuality the star of a web show called the guild, but ingrained enough in the gaming culture to still be relevant to my topic.

This particular experience showed a balance of personal tweets and professional tweets, leaning a little bit heavier on the personal side.  There was one tweeter in particular, @geoffkeighley, who almost entirely tweeted professional messages.  There were two people I followed, @Timoflegend and @bradshoemaker, who tweeted no professional messages, but still addressed gaming culture in their personal tweets.  In terms of frequency of tweeting, the individuals who were more prone to personal messages tweeted at a much higher rate than those conveying professional messages.  This may explain the phenomenon that Shepherd experienced with more trivial topics rising to the top.  Overall though, from this experience alone, it would seem that Shepherd’s dystopian vision of Twitter is an accurate one.

Even though the assignment description asked us to focus solely on this experience with Twitter, there are a couple comparisons with my prior experience that I feel bear mentioning.  Throughout my use of Twitter I have been following websites and companies in addition to individuals, and find that the former two produce a much higher concentration of professional tweets, most likely because they are the face of a company.  As a result, it seems that my conscious choice to follow only individuals may have skewed this particular experience.  Additionally, there may have been a disproportionately high professional message count with among the people I followed this weekend due to the Tokyo Game Show occurring at the same time.

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Comments
4 Responses to “Twitter and the gaming industry”
  1. aflaten says:

    I follow a fair amount of gaming journalists as well, and I wonder if there’s a correlation in the fact that their tweets are more casual, or less professional, since the communities they cater to perhaps prefer such a style? For example, I feel like game reviewers, who write subjective pieces, can really transition into the informal tweeting style quite comfortably since their audience follows them precisely for the reason of hearing their thoughts.

  2. I’m left wondering …

    “In terms of frequency of tweeting, the individuals who were more prone to personal messages tweeted at a much higher rate than those conveying professional messages. This may explain the phenomenon that Shepherd experienced with more trivial topics rising to the top. Overall though, from this experience alone, it would seem that Shepherd’s dystopian vision of Twitter is an accurate one.”

    … how this validates Shepherd’s dystopian vision. I think I need an example of one of these personal messages. I mean, are they like “I ate a BLT for lunch”? Or are they “I zapped the boss in level 8!”?

    And by a “professional” tweet, do you mean it’s advertising something? Or it’s a link to a news story? Or … ?

    Sorry, I just didn’t feel I understood your distinction here.

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